Abstract

In two areas where street lighting was enhanced to determine whether or not this might positively impact both crime and the fear of crime, it was possible to cost both crimes apparently prevented, and compare this with the cost of improving the lighting. Surprisingly, it was discovered that, because of the use of new but energy-saving lighting, lighting costs actually fell in the three month period following relighting. The number of recorded crimes fell as well, and it is concluded that improvements to street lighting can be both effective and cost-effective.